Thailand Employment Salaries

What are Thailand Employment Salaries?

Most companies oppose the government’s plan to raise the minimum daily wage nationwide to Bt400, US$13, or $300/month, as it will hurt small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), according to the Thai Chamber of Commerce. Chamber chairman Kalin Sarasin said that from the chamber’s discussions with many business operators, it was found that most of them worry over the impact of a further wage rise. He said that only the major companies could make the adjustments to accommodate higher wages due to their massive capital holdings. Most of the companies canvassed by the chamber would rather see the government focus on upgrading labour skills. Kalin said the government should promote more border trade, which is a key way to boost exports. After the government’s policy announcement, the chamber will talk with Deputy Prime Minister Somkid Jatusripitak to propose its opinions on economic issues. Remember, folks, unemployment among native born Thais is 1%. That’s right: one percent!!

Wages in Thailand seem low to Western visitors, but Thailand’s official unemployment rate, 0.56 percent, is among the lowest in the world, (it’s 9.4 percent in India and 6 percent in the Philippines. for example). The jobless rate in Thailand has been under 1 percent since 2011. How did it get so low?

Bank of Thailand spokesman Chirathep Senivongs Na Ayudhya explains: ”Our unemployment rate has been low not because of a different definition from other countries, but because of structural problems,” said . “The agricultural sector absorbs laborers and those who can’t find work can always look for jobs in the informal sector or do something on their own.”

Thai unemployment benefits are 50% of final salary – for a maximum of 180 days. Thai wages are low (see MDs’ salaries, below) so there’s little incentive to stay jobless. Those who lose their jobs often enter the ‘informal sector’ or seek out a part-time job, and so they’re counted as employed.

And 40 percent of Thais are engaged in agriculture, where there is a high percentage of underemployment and seasonal unemployment. The underemployed – estimated at about 0.5 percent – are counted among the employed. So if you lose your job as a store clerk and return home to help out on your family farm for at one hour a week, you are counted as employed.

Then, too, Thailand’s fertility rate from 2010-2015 is estimated at 1.4 by the United Nations Population Fund compared with 3.4 in the Philippines. Plus, its population aged 60+ rose from under 7 percent in 1994 to 15 percent last year, so more people are retiring and fewer entering the workforce. (in Japan, more than a quarter of the population is over 65, has 3+ percent unemployment. There are thought to be 3 million mostly undocumented migrant workers in Thailand from Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. The government is beginning to register foreign workers, but the language barrier and lack of skills is a challenge to increasing their numbers.

And here’s the biggie: the informal sector of the Thai economy – anyone who’s not covered by formal work arrangements – accounted for more than 64 percent of the total workforce. This includes everyone from street vendors to taxi drivers, self-employed: they’re counted as employed.

The government doesn’t plan any major labor-market policy changes this year or next, and the inflation rate is falling (it’s forecast to breach 1 percent) there are no worries about the jobless rate, so expect it to stay very low.

What are Thai doctors’ wages?

Let’s look at the salaries of upper middle-class professionals: physicians, whose salaries vary depending on whether they work in public or private hospitals. Public hospital salaries range is 20,000 – 30,000 Baht/month.

Overtime on 1 or 2 evenings and, say, Saturday, can add another 20,000 to 30,000. Depending on experience or expertise there may be some extra income from pharmaceutical manufacturers for various services which could bring in a further amount of money a possible range 10,000 to 30,000 Baht/month. A private, Bangkok, hospital like Bumrungrad pays 60,000 – 150,000 depending on hours, experience and skills. With some private clinic work on top (most physicians spend time at these), a private sector doctor could earn 2 – 3 million baht a year, or $100,000. Given the purchasing power parity of the Thai baht, that’s an effective income of about $250,000.

Thai Luck,Wages and Dowries

More on Thai Wages

Wages in Thailand seem low to Western visitors, but Thailand’s official unemployment rate, 0.56 percent, is among the lowest in the world, (it’s 9.4 percent in India and 6 percent in the Philippines. for example). The jobless rate in Thailand has been under 1 percent since 2011. How did it get so low?

Bank of Thailand spokesman Chirathep Senivongs Na Ayudhya explains: ”Our unemployment rate has been low not because of a different definition from other countries, but because of structural problems,” said . “The agricultural sector absorbs laborers and those who can’t find work can always look for jobs in the informal sector or do something on their own.”

Thai unemployment benefits are 50% of final salary – for a maximum of 180 days. Thai wages are low (see MDs’ salaries, below) so there’s little incentive to stay jobless. Those who lose their jobs often enter the ‘informal sector’ or seek out a part-time job, and so they’re counted as employed.

And 40 percent of Thais are engaged in agriculture, where there is a high percentage of underemployment and seasonal unemployment. The underemployed – estimated at about 0.5 percent – are counted among the employed. So if you lose your job as a store clerk and return home to help out on your family farm for at one hour a week, you are counted as employed.

Then, too, Thailand’s fertility rate from 2010-2015 is estimated at 1.4 by the United Nations Population Fund compared with 3.4 in the Philippines. Plus, its population aged 60+ rose from under 7 percent in 1994 to 15 percent last year, so more people are retiring and fewer entering the workforce. (in Japan, more than a quarter of the population is over 65, has 3+ percent unemployment. There are thought to be 3 million mostly undocumented migrant workers in Thailand from Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. The government is beginning to register foreign workers, but the language barrier and lack of skills is a challenge to increasing their numbers.

And here’s the biggie: the informal sector of the Thai economy – anyone who’s not covered by formal work arrangements – accounted for more than 64 percent of the total workforce. This includes everyone from street vendors to taxi drivers, self-employed: they’re counted as employed.

The government doesn’t plan any major labor-market policy changes this year or next, and the inflation rate is falling (it’s forecast to breach 1 percent) there are no worries about the jobless rate, so expect it to stay very low.

What are Thai doctors’ wages?

Let’s look at the salaries of upper middle-class professionals: physicians, whose salaries vary depending on whether they work in public or private hospitals. Public hospital salaries range is 20,000 – 30,000 Baht/month.

Overtime on 1 or 2 evenings and, say, Saturday, can add another 20,000 to 30,000. Depending on experience or expertise there may be some extra income from pharmaceutical manufacturers for various services which could bring in a further amount of money a possible range 10,000 to 30,000 Baht/month. A private, Bangkok, hospital like Bumrungrad pays 60,000 – 150,000 depending on hours, experience and skills. With some private clinic work on top (most physicians spend time at these), a private sector doctor could earn 2 – 3 million baht a year, or $100,000. Given the purchasing power parity of the Thai baht, that’s an effective income of about $250,000.

Thai Luck,Wages and Dowries

More on Thai Wages

Wages in Thailand seem low to Western visitors, but Thailand’s official unemployment rate, 0.56 percent, is among the lowest in the world, (it’s 9.4 percent in India and 6 percent in the Philippines. for example). The jobless rate in Thailand has been under 1 percent since 2011. How did it get so low?

Bank of Thailand spokesman Chirathep Senivongs Na Ayudhya explains: ”Our unemployment rate has been low not because of a different definition from other countries, but because of structural problems,” said . “The agricultural sector absorbs laborers and those who can’t find work can always look for jobs in the informal sector or do something on their own.”

Thai unemployment benefits are 50% of final salary – for a maximum of 180 days. Thai wages are low (see MDs’ salaries, below) so there’s little incentive to stay jobless. Those who lose their jobs often enter the ‘informal sector’ or seek out a part-time job, and so they’re counted as employed.

And 40 percent of Thais are engaged in agriculture, where there is a high percentage of underemployment and seasonal unemployment. The underemployed – estimated at about 0.5 percent – are counted among the employed. So if you lose your job as a store clerk and return home to help out on your family farm for at one hour a week, you are counted as employed.

Then, too, Thailand’s fertility rate from 2010-2015 is estimated at 1.4 by the United Nations Population Fund compared with 3.4 in the Philippines. Plus, its population aged 60+ rose from under 7 percent in 1994 to 15 percent last year, so more people are retiring and fewer entering the workforce. (in Japan, more than a quarter of the population is over 65, has 3+ percent unemployment. There are thought to be 3 million mostly undocumented migrant workers in Thailand from Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. The government is beginning to register foreign workers, but the language barrier and lack of skills is a challenge to increasing their numbers.

And here’s the biggie: the informal sector of the Thai economy – anyone who’s not covered by formal work arrangements – accounted for more than 64 percent of the total workforce. This includes everyone from street vendors to taxi drivers, self-employed: they’re counted as employed.

The government doesn’t plan any major labor-market policy changes this year or next, and the inflation rate is falling (it’s forecast to breach 1 percent) there are no worries about the jobless rate, so expect it to stay very low.

What are Thai doctors’ wages?

Let’s look at the salaries of upper middle-class professionals: physicians, whose salaries vary depending on whether they work in public or private hospitals. Public hospital salaries range is 20,000 – 30,000 Baht/month.

Overtime on 1 or 2 evenings and, say, Saturday, can add another 20,000 to 30,000. Depending on experience or expertise there may be some extra income from pharmaceutical manufacturers for various services which could bring in a further amount of money a possible range 10,000 to 30,000 Baht/month. A private, Bangkok, hospital like Bumrungrad pays 60,000 – 150,000 depending on hours, experience and skills. With some private clinic work on top (most physicians spend time at these), a private sector doctor could earn 2 – 3 million baht a year, or $100,000. Given the purchasing power parity of the Thai baht, that’s an effective income of about $250,000.

Thai Luck,Wages and Dowries

More on Thai Wages

Thailand’s official unemployment rate, 0.56 percent, is among the lowest in the world, (it’s 9.4 percent in India and 6 percent in the Philippines, for example). Thailand employment is high and doctors’ salaries are low. The jobless rate in Thailand has been under 1 percent since 2011. How did it get so low?

Bank of Thailand spokesman Chirathep Senivongs Na Ayudhya explains: ”Our unemployment rate has been low not because of a different definition from other countries, but because of structural problems,” said . “The agricultural sector absorbs laborers and those who can’t find work can always look for jobs in the informal sector or do something on their own.”

If you’ve been making regular payments into the national unemployment program, Thai unemployment benefits are 50% of your final salary – for a maximum of 180 days. Thai salaries are low (see MDs’ salaries, below) so there’s little incentive to stay jobless. Those who lose their jobs often enter the ‘informal sector’ or seek out a part-time job, and so they’re counted as employed.

And 40 percent of Thais are engaged in agriculture, where there is a high percentage of underemployment and seasonal unemployment. The underemployed – estimated at about 0.5 percent – are counted among the employed. So if you lose your job as a store clerk and return home to help out on your family farm for at one hour a week, you are counted as employed.

Then, too, Thailand’s fertility rate from 2010-2015 is estimated at 1.4 by the United Nations Population Fund compared with 3.4 in the Philippines. Plus, its population aged 60+ rose from under 7 percent in 1994 to 15 percent last year, so more people are retiring and fewer entering the workforce. (in Japan, more than a quarter of the population is over 65, has 3+ percent unemployment.

There are thought to be 3 million mostly undocumented migrant workers in Thailand from Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. The government is beginning to register foreign workers, but the language barrier and lack of skills is a challenge to increasing their numbers.

And here’s the biggie: the informal sector of the Thai economy – anyone who’s not covered by formal work arrangements – accounted for more than 64 percent of the total workforce. This includes everyone from street vendors to taxi drivers, self-employed: they’re counted as employed.

The government doesn’t plan any major labor-market policy changes this year or next, and the inflation rate is falling (it’s forecast to breach 1 percent) there are no worries about the jobless rate, so expect it to stay very low.

What are Thai salaries like?

Let’s look at the salaries of upper middle-class professionals: physicians, whose salaries vary depending on whether they work in public or private hospitals.

Public hospital salaries range is 20,000 – 30,000 Baht/month.

Overtime on 1 or 2 evenings and, say, Saturday, can add another 20,000 to 30,000. Depending on experience or expertise there may be some extra income from pharmaceutical manufacturers for various services which could bring in a further amount of money a possible range 10,000 to 30,000 Baht/month.

Doctors’ salaries in Thailand vary greatly. A private, Bangkok, hospital like Bumrungrad pays 60,000 – 150,000 depending on hours, experience and skills. With some private clinic work on top (most physicians spend time at these), a private sector doctor could earn 2 – 3 million baht a year, or $100,000. Given the purchasing power parity of the Thai baht, that’s an effective income of about $250,000.

For more reading:

  • Cost of Living in Chiang Mai, Thailand – A Little Adrift – A full breakdown of the cost of living in Thailand as an expat living in Chiang Mai. Includes food, rent, internet costs and what those expenses buy you there.
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  • How To Live Like a VIP in Bangkok for $285.06 Per Month – Сейчас […] Reply · Useful links for working & living in Thailand : Thailand Lad says: April 11, 2013 at 6:55 pm. […] http://migrationology.com/2011/07/cost-of-living-in-bangkok-thailand/ – Cost of living in Bangkok, Thailand […].
  • The real cost of living in Thailand – Keyframe5 – Thailand cost of living for a single man. Please note: this post was created on December 2014 with the currency rate at $1 USD = ฿32.9 THB. For the sake of this post and to make it easier to calculate, I’ll covert the currency as …
  • Thailand – Cost of Living – FlippTravel – Price List of the Basic Commodities – Average Costs in $ Milk (regular,1 liter) – 1.41 Loaf of Fresh White Bread (500g) – 1.13 Rice (white, 1kg) –

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